Perl vs Python – Which is Better?

Perl and Python are coding languages you’ve likely heard of. Especially if you already work as a coder or programmer, you are at least familiar with the terms. But, in the great Perl vs. Python – which is better? The debate, you probably want to know which of the two programs will aid you in your specific career path or field. So, let’s take a look at each, how they differ, and which is right for you.

Perl –
This language is dated. It is an older coding language (around in the 1990s), so it is not as recent as Python. This in and of itself puts it at a disadvantage. However, it is easy to use, easy to learn, and fairly basic in the world of coding. So, if you are just getting started, it might be the route you go as a programmer/coder.  There are no constraints with Perl, which is a nice feature for those who don’t want limitations to coding language. Perl gives way too much leverage (which is a reason Python was introduced), but if you understand the language, you can do wonders in the world of coding with it.

Python –
As a response to Perl, many consider Python to be “Perl on training wheels.” It has JVM interoperability, you can work with Java objects, it has a gentle learning curve (beginners/novice coders can learn it quickly), and Python has the largest online community. If you have a question or concern, there is someone there who can respond, and guide you through your problems.

It is great for one-liners, and Linux commands. There is a complex package you can purchase with Python, providing variables which make it even easier to use. It is not as verbose as other languages, is easy to write, and easy to incorporate into any office/business setting for programming.

The debate is one which is often and will continue to be debated by coders and programmers going forward. If you prefer simplicity, ease of use, and navigability, Python may be the way to go. Further, if you want newer, Python is it. On the flip side, Perl is more robust, is basic, and there are no constraints in place. If you like freedom of mobility, this might be the route for you to choose.

Regardless of the programming tools used, when coding, you want something that you understand. These are a few differences with each, to help you choose whether to go with Perl or Python for your coding needs.

Most Common Mistakes Programmers Make

Most coders make a lot of common mistakes throughout their programming life, especially for beginners. Some of these errors turn out to be very frustrating when a program fails to compile. Below is a list of some mistakes beginners make.

1. Messy code formatting

Most of the beginner programmers do not indent their code properly and use both whitespaces and new lines inconsistently. Although some languages such as JavaScript do not have restrictions on the code format, it is always important to indent your code so that we show its logical structure. On the other hand, whitespaces indicate where our functions, conditions, and loops start and end. This helps us avoid mistakes such as declaring a variable or function in the wrong scope.

2. Inconsistent use of lowercase and uppercase

Some programming languages are case-sensitive while others are not. Regardless the language you are using, it is always important that you remain consistent in the use of lowercase and uppercase characters when naming variables and functions. In a case where a programmer declares a variable as “var Age= 5”, then tries to reference it as “if (age>6)”; the code doesn’t run. It is recommended that a programmer applies the right convention to a particular language.

3. Over-commenting

Most programmers prefer writing their code in such a way that the variable, functions, class names and the overall architecture of the code are self-explanatory. However, there is no need to use lengthy comments or comment every line of code as if you are writing your first program.

4. Failure to know the full expressive power of a language

After one or two years into coding, a programmer should be well conversant with some of the less common functions and operators and know where to apply them to simplify their work. This helps you implement programs in fewer lines of code regardless the language you are using. However, some of the coders stick to formats they learned as beginners.

5. Confusion between programming languages, platforms, frameworks, and IDEs

Programmers, especially beginners are sometimes confused on the rules applied when using a particular language. As well, different styles have different coding platforms and IDE’s. It is essential that a coder understands the most appropriate languages for web programming, front-end web development, android programming, and general programming purposes.

6. Failure to use debugging tools

Most coders do not make use of the debugger, which is very useful when it comes to tracking down and fixing bugs in your code. Any programmer writing code in a statically typed language like C#, Java, or ActionScript3 should take advantage of debugging tools.

Other common mistakes coders make include using bad variable and function names, failure to back up their work, trusting third party codes,

5 Great Jobs for Coders

There is a great difference between using a computer and programming it. Coding means writing the actual instructions that a computer system uses to process and execute its functions. The modern workplace has a high demand for programming experts, with several career paths revolving around coding as computing and technology have become part of our lives. Some of the top jobs for coders include:

1. Network Systems Design and Administration

Network administration is a field that focuses on the interconnection of among computer systems, their components and how they interact. One of the most common networks is the internet, a primary function of every computer. Network designers and administrators are the people behind this concept and the underlying technology. Network administrators are also responsible for the design, implementation, testing, and maintenance of a company’s, organization’s or institution’s internal network.

2. Software Development

Software development is the main career line people think of when they join the programming field. It involves writing code to produce software programs and applications for both desktop and mobile devices. The area also involves developing computer games, employee databases, inventories and other management systems. A career in software development requires a bachelor’s degree in software engineering r computer science alongside your coding knowledge.

3. Data Analysis

Data analysis is the science of applying maths, computational theories and statistics to model some data. It is evident that big data is transforming the insurance and business world as well as government functions. Advancements in this career line have made things easier for business analysts, data analysts and financial analysts among other professions. Analysts use computer programming knowledge to analyze data and solve real-life problems in the business and finance world. Data analysts require coding skills in data management, data science, and business intelligence.

4. Hardware Engineering

It refers to the design and building of computers. Computer hardware is built on the concept of logic; where the programmer applies knowledge on discrete structures and electronics to come up with a functional architecture. Such designs include smartphones and automatic teller machines. A hardware engineer requires excellent skills in computer-aided design, computer aided manufacturing, and general programming languages.

5. Information Technology

IT professionals who write software, build computer networks and create websites require programming knowledge. The IT field is widespread beyond the tech industry, to the finance, healthcare, automotive, manufacturing sectors to mention but a few. An IT specialist needs good skills in general programming languages, databases and business intelligence, web development, data science among others.

Other great jobs for coders include graphic design, project management, system analysis, database administration and science research.

Can Anyone Learn to Code?


Can Anyone Learn to Code? Sure. However, this mentality, in theory, is only going to take you so far. There are many self-taught coders, who are really good at the work they do. Especially if you are driven, are using the right tools and resources, and are willing to put the time in, you can learn how to code and write code.

Learning doesn’t mean understanding
Just because you can learn how to code the language, doesn’t mean you are going to use it in practice. The second prong of the quote “Anyone can learn how to code,” is “Doesn’t mean coding is for everyone.” Just because you can learn how to code, doesn’t mean you should learn how to code, nor does it mean you are going to be good at the coding work you perform in practice.

Boot camps aren’t the “ultimate tool”
Sure, you can find those online boot camps that will cram down the information you need to learn down your throat. And yes, many of these programs are taught by professionals in the field and provide the information you need to learn to work as a coder. However, these tools/educational resources are not for everyone.  Is coding for you? Check this article out.

Education isn’t always on a level scale
When you learn something in class, this doesn’t mean you can put the theory to practice. You have to consider that not everyone will learn everything that is taught to them at the same level of expertise. Quality over quantity should be the approach you take when it comes to coding. If you learn everything in a week, are you going to learn the material? Some people might, but others won’t. You have to keep in mind that not everyone learns things at the same pace, level, or expertise when it comes to coding which is taught in schools/online programs.

You can learn anything in theory; this includes coding. But, keep in mind that it is very complex and is the type of field that is only going to accept those that are the very best in the field of work. So, just because you can (are capable of learning something) doesn’t mean you should, nor does it say you are going to be efficient/useful in the work.

If you are considering a career in coding, it is essential to find these factors, before you delve in and overpay for programs to learn the material, consider the repercussions of not choosing the right approach, teachers, and techniques in the world of coding.